Biography of Katherine Stuart van Wormer, MSSW, Ph.D., a Professor of Social Work at the University of Northern Iowa.

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The Maids Narratives

On July 12, 2014 By

The stories personalize the sufferings by these southern black women who worked as young children in the cotton fields and who managed somehow to raise their children and protect their men folk in a racially hostile environment. The economic oppression they endured was echoed by legal constraints that always favored the dominant race at their expense. The norms of segregation, as the book explains, were enforced by white men bent on suppressing black men and keeping them away from their women. At the same time, these men had access to black women, a fact of which they often took advantage. The term segregation to the extent that it means separation of the races does not really apply. In any case, the social system that evolved following slavery. Consider the tremendous legal battles that ensued to keep the races separate in the schools and universities.

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Rosenwald, Julius

On July 5, 2014 By

Julius Rosenwald (1862 – 1932): Influential Philanthropist and Humanitarian

Julius Rosenwald was born on August 12, 1862, to Samuel and Augusta Rosenwald, both Jewish immigrants, in Springfield, Illinois. Rosenwald was educated in the public schools in Springfield, and in 1879 he began his business career with Hammerslough Brothers, wholesale clothiers in New York City.

In 1885, [...]

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This lengthy report is significant for several reason: 1) it was written by a “resident” of the Chicago Settlement in 1925 0r 1926, thirty years after the founding of the organization; 2) his opportunities to interview and observe Mary McDowell, the original Head Worker, and compare her work and vision with the then current programs was exceptional; and 3) the author’s relationship and perspective of the other residents, both paid staff and the volunteers who lived and worked in the agency, shared meals, worked with the neighborho0d people and otherwise interacted on a daily basis, offers an insight seldom reported in the history of settlements of that period. No specific information about D.E. Proctor beyond this report is available.

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Laura J. Praglin, Ph.D., LMSW is an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Northern Iowa. Her research and teaching interests include the history of social work, especially the interaction of the early social work profession with other civicand religious organizations.

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Hodder, Jessie Donaldson

On June 27, 2014 By

Jessie Donaldson Hodder had some of her early training in social work at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, where she worked (ca. 1907-1911) with Dr. Richard C. Cabot at the MGH’s recently established social service clinic. While at the MGH she provided much needed assistance to unwed mothers and women suffering from venereal diseases. After leaving the MGH she continued her pioneering efforts as Superintendent of the Massachusetts Prison and Reformatory for Women (1911-1931).

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During the tenures of Kate Waller Barrett and Robert Barrett, the Crittenton homes began to be influenced by the emerging profession of social work. The NFCM began to offer professional training to staff members and worked to make homes comply with new state standards for child welfare. This trend was to have a profound influence on Crittenton methods over the next two decades, even while some homes retained their religious evangelical character and remained true to their original policy of encouraging unwed mothers to raise their own children. Issues faced during these years included: professional training of social workers, changing attitudes towards adoption, and meeting standards set by state welfare agencies.

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Catt, Carrie Chapman

On June 24, 2014 By

A dynamic speaker and tenacious organizer, Carrie Chapman Catt was a powerful force in the woman suffrage movement. Her relentless campaigning won President Woodrow Wilson’s respect and support, and ultimately led to passage of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women the right to vote.

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Women and the Vote

On June 24, 2014 By

Women are thinking and that is the first step toward an increased and more intelligent use of the ballot. Then they will demand of their political parties clear statements of principles and they will scrutinize their party’s candidates, watch their records, listen to their promises and expect them to live up to them and to have their party’s backing, and occasionally when the need arises, women will reject their party and its candidates. This will not be disloyalty but will show that as members of a party they are loyal first to the fine things for which the party stands and when it rejects those things or forgets the legitimate objects for which political parties exist, then as a party it cannot command the honest loyalty of its members.

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Company Unions and the A. F. of L.

by Louis Adamic, An Article in The Nation, July 18, 1934

ON Saturday, June 16–the day after the tragic fizzling-out of the militant rank-and-file strike movement in the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers, described in The Nation of two weeks ago–I went [...]

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