This original January 1939 document is a significant early step in attempting to define Community Organization as a method of social work.

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McNally, Deborah

On April 9, 2013 By

Debbie McNally is a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Washington, Seattle whose primary field is early American history.  She received her B.A. from the University of Washington in 2003, cum laude with distinction in History, and her M.A. in 2006. Debbie’s interests include slavery, race, gender, and women’s history.  Her dissertation, titled [...]

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Mall, Mary Lou Ricker

On September 27, 2012 By

Mary Lou Ricker Mall contributed information and original materials about her grandfather Leroy Allen Halbert. Currently Mary’s home is the repository for much of the original writing of Rev. Leroy Allen Halbert. Her grandfather was the inspiration for her interest in a career in the helping professions. Mary has degrees in Early Childhood Education and Special Education from [...]

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Talpers, Jeanne Schiff

On August 6, 2012 By

Jeanne Schiff Talpers, daughter of Philip Schiff,  wrote essays on Madison House as a way to “discover” her father’s passion for social action.  His early death at age 56 left many unanswered questions, but fortunately the archives of Madison House at the Social Welfare Archives of the University of Minnesota brought “the House” and her [...]

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Crittenton, Charles Nelson

On May 28, 2012 By

Charles Nelson Crittenton (1833-1909) – Business Owner, Evangelist, Philanthropist and Founder of the National Florence Crittenton Mission

 

Introduction: [...]

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Knights of Labor

On May 25, 2012 By

The Union Pacific Railroad had cut wages, yet through the aggressive leadership of Joseph R. Buchanan the original wages were restored. Buchanan reproduced the success in a number of other railroad strike incidents, all of which became associated nationally with the Knights of Labor despite their mostly local nature. The Knights of Labor had an explicitly anti-strike mentality, but the local autonomy of assemblies had allowed their name to become known as a powerful and assertive group, including financially, which could create sensational successes in assertive worker action. This hyped image was reinforced when local Knights called for help in an effort against notorious and unscrupulous railroad financier Jay Gould.

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Peck, Amanda

On August 31, 2011 By

Assistant Director for External Affairs and Donor Relations  for University Settlement and its subsidiary organization: The Door.

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Vourlekis, Betsy Schaefer, Ph.D.

On February 9, 2011 By

Betsy Schaefer Vourlekis, Ph.D. is professor emeritus of social work at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. She received her B.A. from Harvard University, majoring in East Asian History, MSW from Columbia University, and Ph.D. in Human Development from the University of Maryland, College Park. She practiced psychiatric social work at St. Elizabeths [...]

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Stuart, Paul H., Ph.D.

On February 9, 2011 By

Paul H. Stuart, Ph.D., Professor, School of Social Work, University of Alabama and co-editor: Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America. Professor and Chair of the Ph.D. Program. Field(s) of inetrest: History of social work and social welfare; federal Indian policy; Editor of The Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America. Selected Publications: [...]

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Peebles-Wilkins, Wilma, Ph.D.

On February 9, 2011 By

Wilma Peebles-Wilkins, Ph.D., is Dean Emeritus at Boston University and a former scholar at the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University. She served for several years as Dean, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA. Dr. Peebles-Wilkins has written and published extensively on the history of Blacks in American social welfare. Among her [...]

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