Although it might seem presumptuous to encompass in a portion of a paper so vast a topic as the scope and function of social casework, it is necessary to attempt at least a sketch of this. The reason is that social casework is in constant flux. As it responds to two sets of influences, changes in society and the findings of the social and biological sciences, it takes on a role which I believe makes it quite different from what it was twenty or thirty years ago.

Continue Reading

William Penn was for many months a prisoner in the Tower of London, and many thousands of Friends during that period were incarcerated; there being at one time more than three thousand of them imprisoned and scores of them died in jail, and many more after being released, from the abuse and the diseases contracted therein. These terrible experiences, both in England and Massachusetts, probably impressed very forcibly upon the Friends of that day, and upon their successors.

Continue Reading

Pennsylvania Prison Society

On August 18, 2014 By

In 1794 the Society succeeded in securing the abolition of the exaction of fees by the jailers as a condition of release, and a competent salary was authorized to be paid to the prison officials. About the same time it was decreed that capital punishment should be inflicted only for the crime of murder. Barbarous methods of punishment, such as the pillory, branding with hot irons, the whipping post, were soon dispensed with as reformatory measures.

Continue Reading

Livingston, Edward

On August 17, 2014 By

The complete works of Mr. Livingston, consisting of systems of penal law for the state of Louisiana and for the United States of America were published by the National Prison Association in 1873. Dr. K. C. Wines, in a prefatory note to that edition, says: “The Association is happy in being made the organ of giving to the country and the world a new edition of the writings of an American jurist and philanthropist who has done so much to illustrate and advance his age in one of the highest and noblest departments of civilization.”

Continue Reading

Sanborn, Franklin Benjamin

On August 17, 2014 By

When the board of State Charities was organized in 1863, he was made its first secretary by the appointment of Governor John A. Andrew. So admirably did he fill that position that he was reappointed in various offices for nearly a quarter of a century. In connection with his work, he was instrumental along with Dr. S. G. Howe and others in establishing the Clarke School for the Deaf at Northhampton, of which he has been manager for forty-two years and which ranks as one of the best schools of the kind in the world.

Continue Reading

Brockway, Zebulon Reed

On August 17, 2014 By

In the Detroit institution, Mr. Brockway introduced unusual reformatory measures. Educational and moral impressions were called upon and successfully applied. The prisoners were allowed the experiment of profit-sharing in the labor, and a successful experiment was made of admitting selected female prisoners to family life in the auxiliary House of Shelter outside of the prison enclosure. Male and female prisoners were employed in subordinate positions in the government of the House of Correction, and during this period was born at Detroit, the principles of the indeterminate sentence (limited)

Continue Reading

This is a 1934 review of Harriett Bartlett’s Book “Medical Social Work.”

Continue Reading

The biological base of human growth and development was impressively shown. It was clearly seen also that understanding of this biological base of human behavior is essential to comprehending human behavior in any of its manifestations. Instinctual biologic drives in physical and emotional growth and development are interdigitated and dynamic. These are expressed in emotional and social behavior just as they are in changes of size, structure and ability of the person.

Continue Reading

In 1938, the Advisory Committee on Maternal and Child-Health Services met with the Children’s Bureau and made several recommendations. This is a response.

Continue Reading

The first recommendation declared: “The advisory committee, recognizing that efficient administration of the maternal and child-health services depends upon the employment of fully qualified personnel and that personnel with such qualifications are not always resident within each State, urges that (1) selection of personnel be on the basis of qualifications only and (2) that salaries commensurate with the qualifications required and services performed be paid.”

Continue Reading